Welcome Back Students and Parents! Let’s Make It a Great 2018!


Happy New Year! Welcome to the online presence of Mrs. Gastelum’s Language Arts Classes.  We’re halfway through the year and still have much to accomplish! Use this site to help you stay focused on your goals. Challenges are headed our way, but with dedication and effort, we’ll meet them head on!

Check the calendar for the class agenda and use the links provided to visit the school and the library websites.

If you are absent, it’s your responsibility to find out what you’ve missed.  Visiting this site will help you do just that.

Parents, if you haven’t already done so, please contact our office at 386-329-0588 to get your Skyward account so you can check the grade book as often as you would like.  This is a great way to stay on tops of things.  Students who have parents with Skyward access often do far better in their classes.  You are also encouraged to sigh up for text messages through remind.com.  Information is available on this site and provided by me on the first day of school.

Remember if you have any questions you can always email me at dgastelum@my.putnamschools.org.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2018/01/09/welcome-back-students-parents-lets-make-great-2018/

THE HISTORY OF NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS

Click here to read the article and view the video before completing your reflection journal topic.

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2018/01/09/history-new-years-resolutions/

Patin’s Punkin Patch

Spooky Cajun ghost story about two boys’ misadventures in a haunted pumpkin patch one Halloween.

Source: Patin’s Punkin Patch

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2017/10/08/patins-punkin-patch/

The 5 Types of Text Structure

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2017/09/27/5-types-text-structure/

Wake Me Up When September Ends by Green Day

  • Green Day lead singer Billie Joe Armstrong wrote this song about his father, who died of cancer on September 1, 1982. At his father’s funeral, Billie cried, ran home and locked himself in his room. When his mother got home and knocked on the door to Billie’s room, Billie simply said, “Wake me up when September ends,” hence the title.
  • The line “seven years has gone so fast” is a reference to how Billie Joe Armstrong and Mike Dirnt’s band Sweet Children (which would morph into Green Day), was formed seven years after Armstrong’s father died.

    “20 years has gone so fast” represents the time from his father’s death to when Billie Joe wrote the song.

  • This was originally slated for Green Day’s 2002 compilation album Shenanigans, but Billie Joe didn’t feel that he was in an emotional state to record it, so the song was held back and used on American Idiot>>
  • The video was directed by Samuel Bayer, who directed Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” video. Jamie Bell and Evan Rachel Wood starred in the video, which isn’t about Armstrong’s father, but more a reflection on the mood in American after the September 11 attacks. In an interview with MTV, Bayer said this video was “hands down the greatest thing I’ve ever done.” >>
  • According to VH1’s Pop-Up Video, all the explosions in the clip were real. One effects guy even had to dodge a rocket when it flew through the window where he was stationed.

songfacts.com

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2017/09/01/wake-september-ends-green-day/

Welcome Students and Parents! Let’s Make It a Great Year!


Welcome_largeWelcome to the online presence of Mrs. Gastelum’s Language Arts Classes.  On this site you’ll find information you’ll use for class as well as useful resources to help you excel in Language Arts. 

Check the calendar for the class agenda and use the links provided to visit the school and the library websites.

If you are absent, it’s your responsibility to find out what you’ve missed.  Visiting this site will help you do just that.

Parents, if you haven’t already done so, please contact our office at 386-329-0588 to get your Skyward account so you can check the grade book as often as you would like.  This is a great way to stay on tops of things.  Students who have parents with Skyward access often do far better in their classes.  You are also encouraged to sigh up for text messages through remind.com.  Information is available on this site and provided by me on the first day of school.

Remember if you have any questions you can always email me at dgastelum@my.putnamschools.org.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2017/08/08/welcome-students-and-parents20172018/

What is an Objective Summary?

Objective means “not influenced by personal feelings or interpretation.” A summary is a short statement that gives the main points or ideas of something. So an objective summary is a short statement or paragraph that tells what something is about but does not include irrelevant details or your opinions. HINT: An objective summary should not be written in the first person (“I”) voice.

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2017/01/19/what-is-an-objective-summery/

What is a Central Idea?


A central idea is a main point that the author is making (also called a main idea or a key idea). In other words, a central idea is what the article is mostly about. You can think of a central idea as a thesis statement: one sentence that states what the article is about. A text could have more than one central idea. A central idea can always be supported with details from the text. HINT: When you search for central ideas, be sure to pay special attention to titles, subheadings, and the first and last sentences of each section.

 

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2017/01/19/what-is-a-central-idea/

Punctuating Dialogue

dialoguebubblesClick on this link to find information about the correct way to punctuate dialogue.

CLICK HERE

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2016/11/06/punctuating-dialogue/

Biography of Edgar Allan Poe

poe-006Click here to view the biography of Edgar Allan Poe

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2016/10/17/biography-edgar-allan-poe/

What Are Nouns?

The basic definition of a noun is a person, place, thing or idea.

Watch this short video to learn more.

 

Review your Nouns paper and make corrections after viewing the video.  Turn in.

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2016/08/26/what-are-nouns/

Types of Sentences

When you learn to write, you begin by learning about the four types of sentences and the role punctuation plays in determining and creating those different sentence types.

The four types of sentences in the English language include:

  • Declarative sentence
  • Imperative sentence
  • Interrogative sentence
  • Exclamatory sentence

And there are only three punctuation marks with which to end a sentence:

  • Period
  • Question mark
  • Exclamation point

Click this link to learn more: Types of Sentences

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2016/08/26/types-of-sentences/

Grammar Rock

grammarrock

 

Complete the Grammar Rock worksheet by answering the questions about each video. 

Be prepared to share and discuss your answers.

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2016/08/15/grammar-rock/

Caught’ya Vocabulary 01

CaughtYaUse these words to complete the class and homework assignments and to study for your vocabulary quiz.  Quiz date will be announced soon.

Caught’ya 01 Vocabulary

 

Definition Part of
Speech
Sentence
1. jilt:  to abruptly reject and cast aside a sweetheart
Verb
His fiancee will jilt him by refusing marriage.
2. innocuous:  not causing injury, harm or hurt
Adjective
The innocuous remark was harmless and benign.
3. chap:  British word for fellow or man  (mine)
Noun
After he’d knocked him down, Harry invited that chap to stand up and have it out.
4. exceedingly:  extremely or to a great degree
Adverb
The exceedingly long wait took many hours.
5. alluring:  attractive, charming, or fascinating
Adjective
The alluring, or attractive, girl was charming.
6. fickle:  frequently changing one’s mind or attitude
Adjective
The fickle man is kind one day, mean the next.
7. despicable:  dreadful and disgraceful
Adjective
His despicable behavior was truly appalling.
8. repulsive:  causing feelings of disgust
Adjective
I touched the repulsive, disgusting toad.
9. visage:  the face or appearance of a person
Noun
A frown soured his formerly glowing visage.
10. vituperative:  containing or characterized by verbal abuse
Adjective
Her vituperative words caused him so much pain, he left town and never returned.

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2016/08/15/caughtya-vocabulary-01/

Caught’ya Vocabulary 02

Copy or print this page to add to your notebook.  You’ll need to know spelling, definitions and parts of speech for these words.

  1. malicious: (Adjective) full of, characterized by, or  showing malice; intentionally harmful; spiteful
  2. grotesque: (Adjective) odd or unnatural in shape, appearance, or character; fantastically ugly or absurd; bizarre.
  3. repulsive: (Adjective) causing repugnance or aversion: a repulsive mask.
  4. regret:  (verb) to feel sorrow or remorse for (an act, fault, disappointment, etc.)
  5. insignificant: (Adjective) unimportant, trifling, or petty
  6. dejected: (Adjective) depressed in spirits; disheartened; low-spirited
  7. odious: (Adjective) deserving or causing hatred; hateful; detestable.
  8. vicious: (Adjective) spiteful; malicious
  9. profanely: (Adverb) vulgarly, rudely, crudely
  10. demolish: (verb) to destroy or ruin (a building or other structure), especially on purpose; tear down; raze.
  11. fiend: (noun) a diabolically cruel or wicked person.
  12. irately: (adverb) angrily

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2015/09/15/caughtya-vocabulary-02/

Caught’ya Vocabulary 03

Copy the following words, definitions and parts of speech and place your paper in your notebook.  Use these to study for your test.

 

  1. utterly: completely and without qualification (adverb)
  2. resentment: a feeling of deep and bitter anger and ill-will (noun)
  3. exquisite: delicately beautiful (adjective)
  4. considerate: showing concern for the rights and feelings of others (adjective)
  5. gracious: characterized by kindness and warm courtesy (adjective)
  6. accurate: characterized by perfect conformity to fact or truth (adjective)
  7. convince: make realize the truth or validity of something (verb)
  8. atrocious: shockingly brutal or cruel (adjective)
  9. investigate: conduct an inquiry of (verb)
  10. ajar: slightly open (adverb)

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2015/09/20/caughtya-vocabulary-03/

Caught’ya Vocabulary 04

1. noiselessly: accompanied by or making little or no noise; silently; quietly  (adverb) 

2. gawk: to look at something stupidly (verb)

3. horrendous: shockingly horrible (adjective)

4. hefty: large and powerful, often heavy as well (adjective)

5. precariously: in an insecure or unstable manner (adverb)

6. warily: with considerable caution and watchfulness (adverb)

7. colossal: being huge or extremely large in size (adjective)

8. rampage: violent or reckless behavior (noun or verb)

9. appalling: awful or terrible (adjective)

10. outburst: sudden and unrestrained activity or emotion (noun)

11. debris: broken and leftover pieces (noun)

12. smirk: a smug or sly smile (verb) 

13. scrutinize: inspect carefully (verb)

 

 

For homework pick one assignment:  

  1. Complete vocabulary word diagrams, one for each word  OR
  2. Visit VocabularySpellingCity.com and complete the assignments for Vocabulary 4.

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2015/09/28/caughtya-vocabulary-03-2/

Caught’ya Vocab05

scrutinize: inspect carefully Verb I scrutinize each piece to look for flaws.
massive:  of or on a very large scale Adjective The massive pillars made us feel very small.
intrusion: entrance by force or without invitation Noun Pardon my intrusion into your conversation.
compromise: to come to a mutual agreement Verb We can compromise and come to an agreement.
terminate: to end or extinguish Verb I resolve to terminate my bad habits.
vital: absolutely necessary Adjective Food and water are vital for survival.
halt: come to a stop Verb I wanted to halt, but he said to keep going.
hastily: quickly or without thinking Adverb We hastily ran to catch the bus.
declare: to make known in an official fashion Verb Shout and declare the news for all to hear.
panic: be overcome with fear or anxiety Verb In case of a fire, be calm and don’t panic.
shriek: a brief loud cry, often at a high pitch Noun She let out a loud shriek when he scared her.
abruptly: suddenly or without warning Adverb She abruptly stopped talking in mid-sentence.

Complete vocabulary word diagrams for each of these words.  Do NOT use the example sentences.  You must create your own original sentences.

OR

Complete the online assignment on Vocabulary Spelling City.com.

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2015/10/04/vocab05/

Caught’ya Vocabulary 06

Use the words to create Vocabulary Word Diagrams OR complete the assignment on Vocabulary Spelling City.  Due by 10/27/17

 

Permanent link to this article: http://jmseagles.com/jmsenglish/blog/2015/10/12/caughtya-vocabulary-06/

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